Stamford Bridge

Stamford Bridge – Home of Chelsea FC

Whether you are an eternal Chelsea fan or just love football, you will find plenty of interest when you go behind the scenes at Stamford Bridge and learn about how Chelsea football players prepare for a match.

Highlights

  • Learn about the history of Stamford Bridge in the Chelsea FC Museum
  • Go behind the scenes and explore the changing rooms
  • Run through the Players’ Tunnel, out onto the pitch

What to see and do

Walking towards the stadium, you will see a statue of legendary player Peter Osgood, and murals and images of many other famous players, such as Didier Drogba. The outside of the stadium looks large and imposing, and if you are a true fan of the blues, you won’t want to wait to get inside! But first, you have to go to the stadium hub, where you can sign up for the stadium tour and also look around the Chelsea FC Museum.

The Chelsea FC Museum

A guided tour of the museum and stadium lasts for about one hour. On entering the museum, you will be greeted with displays of international memorabilia from past and present Chelsea players before heading up the staircase, which lights up slowly as you ascend, and features more large photos of Chelsea stars.

Look on highlights of the 2012 Champions League when Chelsea triumphed over Bayer Munich winning the final on penalties. See the shirts of every player who was in the starting eleven for the game, as well as signed boots from every player below them. And in a large glass case, stand the Champions League trophy itself.

There is also a display of the Europa Cup, which Chelsea won in 2013, along with numerous FA Cup and League Cup trophies.

The museum also features a shooting practice area which is great if you want to burn off some energy or show off your penalty skills!

Among the many cool features are two scale models; one of what Stamford Bridge used to look like, and the other a model of how it looks today; fans will be interested in comparing the developments.

The Stands and the Press Box

Next stop on tour is to venture out onto the stands to see the pitch on which Chelsea have played since 1905, and then to see the Press Box, which is where journalists and sports commentators sit during a game. Every seat is fitted with its own small television to show the game footage and replays.

The Press Room

You’ll get the chance to see the room where Chelsea managers and players have held press conferences over the years. An excellent opportunity to take a selfie or two while sitting at the desk.

The Interview Board and the Changing Rooms (both home and away)

The home changing area is unsurprisingly much larger than the away facilities with physio beds, lots of showers, a separate tactics room and ice baths.

Heading through the Players’ Tunnel onto the pitch

No crowds will be screaming, but walking through the Players’ Tunnel still sends a shiver down the spine and provides profound insights into what it must feel like to be a player walking out onto the pitch at the start of a game. You can then walk around the pitch or sit in the manager’s seat or the subs bench and see the rest of the stadium from their perspective.

Did you know? (4 interesting facts!)

  1. The Champions League trophy isn’t the actual trophy but is a replica provided by the Champions League to the winners so they can keep the cup forever.
  1. Chelsea FC was the first football team to wear numbers on their shirts.
  1. The stadium currently holds 408543 seats.
  1. Every player has their own plaque in the changing room as they always sit in the same positions.

History

1877 – The venue was built and used by the London Athletic Club

1905 – The stadium was taken over by Chelsea Football Club

The 1990s – The stadium was renovated into a state-of-the-art modern arena

Facilities and accessibility

Individual handheld iPads are available on stadium tours which are used to provide information about the exhibits and interactive features, in addition to the tour guides.

Chelsea FC Stadium itself is wheelchair accessible, and there are handrails on the majority of the walkways. Although there are steps in certain areas, there are accessibility lifts that people with mobility issues can use.

There is a hearing loop system throughout the stadium and museum, and assistance dogs are welcome. Blue badge parking spaces are available near the entrance to Chelsea FC Stadium.

There is a two-floor Megastore on the site which sells a range of memorabilia and football clothing.